Final four

Discussion in 'NCAA Lacrosse Forum' started by swami24, May 27, 2017.

  1. swami24

    swami24 Well-Known Member

    Two amazing games today, both one goal wins. The MD Denver had each team have a goal disallowed due to crease violations, in the last few mins of the game.
     
  2. dougm

    dougm Well-Known Member

    those disallowed goals were the correct call of a terribly written rule.
     
  3. swami24

    swami24 Well-Known Member

    Yes, the NLL has it much better, where you take off, landing after goal doesn't matter. With no real idea, I assume it is written for goalie safety.
     
  4. RockStar

    RockStar Well-Known Member

    goals called back for shooter landing in crease, no?

    i wish theyd just allow the men to play men's lacrosse....ncaa athletes can handle dive shots with tight parameters

    for box, It's a little funny, actually. NLL is strict as hell on where/when you land, CLA is only strict on where your feet are when you release the ball.

    FWIW, id prefer nll adopt CLA because it would get rid of about half of goal challenges. Basically, if you release the shot before your feet break the crease 'cylinder' it's all good.
     
  5. chuckster

    chuckster Well-Known Member

    And this particular case, the shooter lands in the crease behind the net nowhere even near the goalie. I guess if the NLL really wanted to protect goalies, they could follow this rule but then that would make for some boring lacrosse at times.
     
  6. swami24

    swami24 Well-Known Member

    One key goal was disallowed because the shooter landed just a toe on the line in front, after the goal. The other shooter landed well behind the net. As a casual viewer, I think they both should have counted. Any dive that causes contact with the goalie after the shooter should be disallowed, but wow, these two disallowed didnt make sense to the causual feild veiwer.
     
  7. dougm

    dougm Well-Known Member

    A.R. 85.
    A1, with his feet gounded prior to, during and after the shot,
    shoots and the ball enters the goal� During the play, he (1) Is legally pushed
    into the crease with the ball entering the goal before A1 lands in the crease;
    or (2) Is illegally pushed into the crease�
    RULING:
    (1) The goal counts� (2)
    Flag-down� The goal counts if the ball enters the goal before A1 lands in
    the crease�

    i know the rule and it is poorly written. and the second one really gets me. first, the kid lands two feet behind the goal and was never a threat to make contact with the goalie. yes if a player leaves his feet at anytime and lands in the crease is no goal unless there was contact that put him into the crease. if you check the replay, , at the time of the shot, he is crosschecked from behind. that was why coach matt brown almost blew up. the rule does not say how much contact, just contact. did the crosscheck push donohue into the air? i still don't know but there appeared to be some contact and since the rule does distinguish a love tap from shiv, then not calling a crease violation would had been justified as well.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2017
  8. smurf666

    smurf666 Guest

    I do prefer the Canadian box rule. You cannot dive as deeply into the crease, but, all that matters is where you release the shot and that you don't collide with the goalie. The landing spot, which usually doesn't even matter in terms of advantage to the shooter or goalie, is inconsequential.

    Removes a tonne of subjectivity, and, debate over whether a fuzzy, imperfect camera angle shows a crease violation or does not....
     
  9. smurf666

    smurf666 Guest

    And, the fact that you cannot dive as deeply in before shooting, protects the goalies somewhat....they are usually "gentler" dives across the top of the crease.

    Also, eliminates the stupid dunk shot.....feet would be over the back line before you could have any angle......

    Always felt hated the dunk because I figured hitting the goal post with your stick should be a crease violation.
     
  10. AmericanRockFan

    AmericanRockFan Well-Known Member

    I watched part of yesterday's championship game. By that, I mean I had it on in the background while I was doing some reading/writing for the psychology website I write for. I enjoyed it, but wish I could've given it my full attention. I really want to like outdoor lacrosse, but it's just hard for me to get into since I grew up watching box lacrosse.
     
  11. roadrunner

    roadrunner Member

    Same for me. Let's all be honest here. The Box game is superior in so many ways to the field game for both spectator and player alike. If they changed a few rules for Field it would make the version of the game so much better - institute a shot clock, take away the long pole, allow crosschecking, take away man/ball rule for loose balls, and eliminate the slashing.
     
  12. AmericanRockFan

    AmericanRockFan Well-Known Member

    It's funny, I could've sworn the announcers said there was a shot clock yesterday toward the end of the game.

    For me, after watching indoor for so long it's hard to get used to the pace of the outdoor game. Plus I've never liked the rule that whoever is closest to the ball when it goes out of bounds gets the ball. I think it should be like soccer where whoever touched it last loses possession. I would like to see some sort of shot clock in the outdoor game, just to keep teams from playing keep away with the ball to run out the clock and to get them to be a bit more aggressive with their offensive tactics.
     
  13. roadrunner

    roadrunner Member

    ARF my apologies. I should have stated an all the time shot clock. Right now in NCAA it is at the officials discretion on whether to start the shot clock or not. Yes the pace is way too slow for me as well.
     
  14. swami24

    swami24 Well-Known Member

     
  15. AmericanRockFan

    AmericanRockFan Well-Known Member

    Okay, I thought there was some sort of shot clock. They should've put some sort of shot clock graphic on the screen for those who aren't as familiar with the outdoor game.
     
  16. dougm

    dougm Well-Known Member

    the discretionary shot clock is a work in progress. I think a 90-second hard shot clock is reasonable. you need some time to accommodate for amount of space the players utilize but you can't go much longer or else what is the point. I can't tell you from a fan's perspective what is a deliberate stall.
     

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